Where to find ATMs in Munich?

WHERE TO FIND ATMs IN MUNICH?

The supply of cash is extremely important, especially when traveling. If you are traveling to a country you have never been to before and you do not know the situation regarding the supply of cash, it is better to think about it and get some information.

ATMs are the quickest way

The easiest way for a tourist to get money abroad is to simply go to an ATM and get the desired amount. But here, the simplicity already ends, as suddenly, many questions appear as for example: “Can I also get money with a credit card?”, “Do I have to pay operator fees?”, “Do I have to pay exchange or bank fees?”. Should I go to an ATM in the street or inside of a bank?” or “Are ATM-scams common in Munich or Germany?”. But the most frequently asked question is: “Where can I find an ATM in Munich?”.

Which ATM providers are there in Munich?

In Munich, there are either bank-operated ATMs or privately operated ATMs, although the private companies also need an official license in Germany. So you can be sure that there are no fraudulent ATMs.
The largest operators of cash dispensers in Munich are:

  • Sparkassen (savings banks)
  • Private Banks (e.g. Commerzbank, Deutsche Bank, Hypobank, Postbank, Reisebank, Targo Bank, Unicredit)
  • Volks- und Raiffeisenbanken (cooperative banks)
  • Private Companies (e.g. Euronet, IC Cash Services, Cardpoint)

Which ATM should I choose?

Now you will surely ask yourself: “Does it make a difference for me as a tourist at which cash machine I withdraw my money? The answer to that is “yes and no”.
Basically, it does not matter whether you use a bank ATM or a privately owned ATM. As a foreign tourist, you will usually pay fees at every ATM. But the amount of these fees and of exchange rates vary from operator to operator. Private ATM operators usually have much higher transaction fees than banks.
My tip here is (if your own bank or credit card company does not reimburse the fees) that you always try to use a bank ATM.

If you like to read more about ATM fees in Munich and Germany, read my post “ATM fees in Munich and Germany” (coming soon).

Are ATMs easy to find in Munich?

Depending on where you come from, you may find it either easy or difficult to find an ATM in Munich. Especially tourists from the USA will find the search for an ATM rather uncomfortable. In the USA you can find ATMs (especially in big cities) in almost every shop, supermarket, or restaurant. Not so in Germany or Munich.
Not long ago you had to go to banks almost without exception to get to an ATM. Often these banks also had mini-branches not only in subway stations, at large train stations, or shopping malls but also throughout the city. But then, more and more banks focused on reducing their expenses and closed many branches. The emerging gap was filled by a few private ATM companies. Today, in addition to the banks and their branches, there are more and more often private-owned ATMs, which can be found in streets or shops, especially in touristy areas.

The most common places where you can find ATM’s in Munich are:

  • Banks (inside or outside of the Bank building)
  • Big train stations (Munich Main Station, Munich East Station, Pasing Station)
  • Big S-Bahn (urban rail) stations (e.g. Marienplatz, Main Station, Stachus (Karlsplatz), Hackerbrücke/ZOB)
  • Many subway stations (e.g. Moosach, Feldmoching, Rotkreuzplatz, Münchner Freiheit, Goetheplatz, Schwanthalerhöhe)
  • Touristy areas (e.g. Stachus (Karlsplatz), Viktualienmarkt)
  • Inside of touristy restaurants
ATM (IC Cash Company) near a subway entrance in Munich

Good to know

Summary and additional short tips and info about ATM’s in Munich:

  • There are lots of ATMs throughout Munich, but maybe not in a density you might be used to.
  • There are bank-owned and private-owned ATMs.
  • The best Chance to find ATMs outside of bank buildings are touristy areas (Viktualienmarket, Marienplatz, Karlsplatz, etc.) urban rail stations and subway stations, and sometimes inside of very touristy restaurants of the Old Town.
  • Private-owned ATMs charge a much higher withdrawal fee than bank ATMs.
  • Private-owned ATMs can be confused with bank-owned ATMs as some use the same color.
  • Even many people speak and understand English, the term “ATM” is not very common. So when asking for the direction to the next ATM, better use the German word “Bankomat” (colloquial but common) or “Geldautomat” (official term).

The Munich taxi system – The complete guide for travellers

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Learn how to use a taxi in Munich and find out about the costs

Getting around in Munich is easy. The most relaxed and convenient way is using a taxi. But how does the Munich taxi system work and is it expensive to ride in a cab? There are often questions like these popping up in traveller forums. Also there is a fear to get scammed by taxidrivers. So here is a complete guide on using taxis in Munich and Germany.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”50″][dt_quote background=”fancy”]

  • how to get from and to the airport/station/my accomodation?
  • Are there “good” and “bad” taxi companies?
  • Do they all have the same prices?
  • How is the tariff calculated?
  • May I take every taxi, or are there differences between the companies?

[/dt_quote][vc_empty_space height=”50″][vc_column_text]I travelled a few countries and realized, that using taxis is something that tourists do more regularly than citizens and they often have questions like these. As a local you know what to to and how to use taxis in your hometown. But especially for first time visitors the taxi system in Germany may be new.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”50″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

The different taxi companies in Munich

Actually there are more than 1.500 different taxi companies in Munich, but you usually won’t notice a thing, as most of them are consolidated in taxi offices. With about 4.000 Taxis Munich has the highest density of taxis per inhabitant in Germany (2.5 taxis per 1.000 citizens). Even the capital of Germany (Berlin) has a lower density (2.3 taxis per 1.000 citizens).

There are two taxi offices in Munich, which manage nearly all taxis in Munich.

Taxi-München: One of the oldest taxi offices in Germany, founded in 1917. It is a mutual company with about 3.000 members (taxis) and therefore the biggest taxi office in Germany.

IsarFunk: Another big taxi office with lots of members (taxis)

 

Taxis in Munich and Germany

Colour: All taxi cars have to be couloured in the same colour-scheme in Germany (exceptions in a few German states, but not in Bavaria). Every taxi has to be painted in „bright ivory“. Actually it looks like cream white or a very bright yellow.

Advertisements: Some taxis have advertisements on their doors. There is no difference between taxis with or without advertisements, so no worries about that.

Taxi signs: All taxis have a specific yellow/black taxi sign on their roof.

Car brands: taxis are often Mercedes-Benz’s but there is no rule that taxis must be Benz’s. You will also find VWs, BMWs, Chryslers, Toyotas and even Porsches or a Maybach.

As mentioned, there are many taxi companies in Munich and most of them are consolidated in the two taxi offices Taxi München e.G. and IsarFunk, but of course it is possible to call the taxi companies directly if you wish. To be honest this is something mostly residents do. As a tourist, I recommend hailing a taxi, or order a taxi through the taxi offices or mobile apps, which is much more convenient.
If you wish to contact the many taxi companies directly, you can search the web for those companies.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”50″][vc_single_image image=”1397″ img_size=”500×500″ alignment=”center” style=”vc_box_rounded”][vc_empty_space height=”80″][vc_column_text]

Finding a taxi in Munich

When you’re in the inner city, you usually won’t have a problem to find a taxi as there are many of them driving around and there are also taxi ranks (cab stands) near main attractions and areas where lot’s of pedestrians are (e.g. rail stations, subway stations and tourist hotspots). But when you’re a bit off in the outskirts, you will have a hard time finding a taxi. There, you usually have to call a taxi office or use a mobile app for ordering a taxi.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”30″][vc_tta_tabs][vc_tta_section i_position=”right” i_icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-hand-paper” add_icon=”true” title=”Hail a taxi in Munich” tab_id=”1582703698497-5bcfbb3a-48c8″][vc_column_text]When you’re in the inner city or a quite touristy area, you will see quite a lot of taxis passing by. If you like to use a taxi, you can hail one. If the taxi is free, the driver will stop for you (or will show you he/she will stop for you in a few meters, where the traffic allows stopping). During the night, you can see if a taxi is free or not, because every taxi that is free has to illuminate the yellow taxi sign on the roof of the car. Taxis without an illuminated sign will not stop for you, as they already have guests or are on their way to pick up guests who ordered a taxi.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”30″][vc_single_image image=”1364″ img_size=”500×500″ alignment=”center” style=”vc_box_rounded”][vc_empty_space height=”30″][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section i_position=”right” i_icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-walking” add_icon=”true” title=”Go to a taxi rank (cab stand)” tab_id=”1582703698542-b80c4ef5-f631″][vc_column_text]When you don’t see any taxis in the street, try walking to a taxi rank (cab stand). You can usually find cab stands in Munich near sights, bigger squares, subway stations and rail stations. It is also possible to call a taxi rank, as the most taxi ranks have a special telephone booth for the taxi drivers who will hop out of their car and answer the call when the booth rings.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section i_position=”right” i_icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-phone-volume” add_icon=”true” title=”Call a taxi office” tab_id=”1582704018324-78d3263a-c817″][vc_column_text]You can call the two taxi offices (Taxi München e.G. and IsarFunk). These taxi offices operate 24/7 and can send a taxi to you.

– Taxi München e.G. phone number is: +49 89 21 610
– IsarFunk phone number is: +49 89 450 540[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section i_position=”right” i_icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-globe” add_icon=”true” title=”Order a taxi online or with a mobile app” tab_id=”1582704019951-a504cc8d-b071″][vc_column_text]You can easily order a taxi online or through a mobile app on your mobile phone.

At the moment there are two major mobile phone apps for ordering a taxi in Munich:

Taxi.eu: With this mobile app it is not only to order a taxi in Munich, but in most European cities (about 100 cities in Europe). You can download the app for Android phones and for phones using IOS (Apple). Or order directly through the website itself. For more information check out the multilingual website www.taxi.eu.

FREE NOW (formerly known as mytaxi): Another big player in Munich concerning online or mobile taxi ordering. The app is available for android phones, apple phones and Blackberry phones. Check out the website www.mytaxi.com or www.free-now.com for more information.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][/vc_tta_tabs][vc_column_text]

The taxi tariffs in Munich

The taxi tariffs in Munich are regulated and supervised by the City of Munich. The taxi tariff is set by a specific taxi tariff decree, therefore you can be sure that every taxi driver will charge you the same price for the same route. Here I will show you the taxi tariffs in Munich (as of Jan 1st 2020):[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”30″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705379406{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][vc_column_text]

Type

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Price in EUR

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approx. price in USD

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approx. price in GBP

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705379406{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][vc_column_text]

Base fare

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3.70

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4.05

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705428906{border: 1px solid #000000 !important;}”][vc_column_text]

3.10

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705379406{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][vc_column_text]

per kilometre (1-5 km)

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2.00

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2.20

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705428906{border: 1px solid #000000 !important;}”][vc_column_text]

1.70

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705379406{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][vc_column_text]

per kilometre (6-10 km)

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1.80

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1.95

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1.50

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705379406{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][vc_column_text]

per kilometre (10+ km)

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1.70

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1.85

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1.40

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705379406{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][vc_column_text]

order fee

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1.40

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1.50

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1.17

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baggage fee (per bag)

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0.70

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0.75

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0.60

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705379406{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][vc_column_text]

waiting time (per hour)

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30.00

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705413427{border: 1px solid #000000 !important;}”][vc_column_text]

32.60

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″ css=”.vc_custom_1582705428906{border: 1px solid #000000 !important;}”][vc_column_text]

25.15

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_empty_space height=”50px”][vc_column_text]These fares are programmed into the taximeters every taxi in Munich has. The tariff system seems quite easy, but most citizens will agree that the prices using a taxi are somehow not predictable. This because of the fare per kilometre is added to the waiting time fare. The waiting time fare always takes action, when the taxi doesn’t move. This is the case when the taxi is stopped by a traffic light, traffic jam or similar things. Every minute the taximeter will then add 0.50 EUR (approx. 0.60 USD, 0.40 GBP). Thats 1/60 of 30.00 EUR waiting time fee[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”50px”][vc_column_text]

Taxi prices for specific routes in Munich

Here you will find the approximate price for routes in Munich usually tourists will do. Please note these prices are approximate and change due to traffic density, baggage and order fees.

Munich International Airport to Munich Main Station: ~90 EUR (ca. 100 USD, ca. 80 GPB)

Munich International Airport to Munich Trade Fair (Riem): flat fee: 67 EUR (ca. 75 USD, ca. 60 GBP)

Munich International Airport to Oktoberfest Grounds: ~100 EUR (ca. 110 USD, ca. 87 GBP)

Munich Main Station to Munich East Station: ~20 EUR (ca. 22 USD, ca. 17 GBP)

Munich Main Station to Nymphenburg Castle: ~20 EUR (ca. 22 USD, ca. 17 GBP)

Munich Main Station to Munich Trade Fair (Riem): ~30 EUR (ca. 33 USD, ca. 26 GBP)

Munich Main Station Oktoberfest Grounds: ~20 EUR (ca. 22 USD, ca. 17 GBP)

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Learn how to tip in Germany – The ultimate guide for travellers

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]One of the most asked questions in traveller forums is:

“How do I tip correctly in Germany?”

And it is not just a phenomenon that affects travellers who come to Germany or Munich. Since almost every country and culture has its own established rules and customs regarding the art of “tipping correctly”, at some point every traveller asks this question.
I would like to introduce you to the art of tipping in Munich and Germany. It differs to a large extent from the habits you may know from your home country.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”80″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Tipping in Germany, Bavaria and Munich

Let it be said in principle: In every part of Germany tips are always given, although not as extensively as in other countries like the USA. But especially in the gastronomy it is done as a nice gesture by almost everybody.

So who should you tip as a traveller in Germany and where should you rather not tip? Here is a simple list for you where to tip.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][icon_counter flip_type=”vertical_flip_bottom” border_size=”2″ border_color=”#a4a4a4″ icon=”icomoon-font-awesome-14×14-cutlery” icon_size=”30″ icon_style=”circle” icon_color_bg=”#81d742″ bg_color=”#ffffff” block_title_front=”Waitresses and waiters in restaurants” block_title_back=”Definitely YES!” height_type=”ifb-custom-height” box_height=”150″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][icon_counter flip_type=”vertical_flip_bottom” border_size=”2″ border_color=”#a4a4a4″ icon=”icomoon-font-awesome-14×14-glass” icon_size=”30″ icon_style=”circle” icon_color_bg=”#81d742″ bg_color=”#ffffff” block_title_front=”Bartenders in a bar or pub” block_title_back=”Sometimes!” block_desc_back=”Only if the bartender works like a waitress or waiter.” height_type=”ifb-custom-height” box_height=”150″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][icon_counter flip_type=”vertical_flip_bottom” border_size=”2″ border_color=”#a4a4a4″ icon=”fas fa-cut” icon_size=”30″ icon_style=”circle” icon_color_bg=”#81d742″ bg_color=”#ffffff” block_title_front=”Barber at the barbershop” block_title_back=”YES!” height_type=”ifb-custom-height” box_height=”150″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][icon_counter flip_type=”vertical_flip_bottom” border_size=”2″ border_color=”#a4a4a4″ icon=”fas fa-luggage-cart” icon_size=”30″ icon_style=”circle” icon_color_bg=”#81d742″ bg_color=”#ffffff” block_title_front=”Bellboy in a hotel” block_title_back=”Definitely YES!” height_type=”ifb-custom-height” box_height=”150″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][icon_counter flip_type=”vertical_flip_bottom” border_size=”2″ border_color=”#a4a4a4″ icon=”fas fa-taxi” icon_size=”30″ icon_style=”circle” icon_color_bg=”#81d742″ bg_color=”#ffffff” block_title_front=”Taxi / limousine driver” block_title_back=”YES!” height_type=”ifb-custom-height” box_height=”150″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][icon_counter flip_type=”vertical_flip_bottom” border_size=”2″ border_color=”#a4a4a4″ icon=”fas fa-door-open” icon_size=”30″ icon_style=”circle” icon_color_bg=”#81d742″ bg_color=”#ffffff” block_title_front=”Door greeters in a hotel” block_title_back=”Not necessary!” block_desc_back=”But you can do. They will be happy.” height_type=”ifb-custom-height” box_height=”150″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][icon_counter flip_type=”vertical_flip_bottom” border_size=”2″ border_color=”#a4a4a4″ icon=”icomoon-font-awesome-14×14-bullseye” icon_size=”30″ icon_style=”circle” icon_color_bg=”#81d742″ bg_color=”#ffffff” block_title_front=”Tour guides or drivers” block_title_back=”YES!” height_type=”ifb-custom-height” box_height=”150″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][icon_counter flip_type=”vertical_flip_bottom” border_size=”2″ border_color=”#a4a4a4″ icon=”icomoon-the7-font-the7-tag-05″ icon_size=”30″ icon_style=”circle” icon_color_bg=”#81d742″ bg_color=”#ffffff” block_title_front=”Cleaning staff in a hotel/accomodation” block_title_back=”YES!” height_type=”ifb-custom-height” box_height=”150″][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][icon_counter flip_type=”vertical_flip_bottom” border_size=”2″ border_color=”#a4a4a4″ icon=”fas fa-restroom” icon_size=”30″ icon_style=”circle” icon_color_bg=”#81d742″ bg_color=”#ffffff” block_title_front=”Cleaning staff in a restroom (public/restaurant/etc.)” block_title_back=”Sometimes!” height_type=”ifb-custom-height” box_height=”150″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

The tipping procedure

If you come from a Mediterranean country like Greece, Italy, or Spain or for example from the USA, the “German way” of tipping will confuse you at first and you will feel uncomfortable. This is where we tend to have a culture clash. Different points of view meet and often tourists will think that German waiters and waitresses are generally unfriendly. But this is not the case. It is just a different way of interacting with each other. I will now explain to you how tipping is done in Germany. Try to memorize the procedure so that you do not risk to experience a culture shock.[/vc_column_text][icon_timeline timeline_line_color=”#000000″ time_sep_bg_color=”#81d742″][icon_timeline_item time_title=”Step 1: You’re ready to pay your bill” icon_type=”selector” icon=”fas fa-hand-paper” icon_size=”30″ icon_color=”#81d742″ icon_color_bg=”#ffffff”]There comes a time when the best meal is eaten or the best drink is drunk and you would like to pay. In Germany it is quite common to draw the attention of waiters and waitresses to you by discreetly signaling to them. And here the culture shock already begins. In some cultures, it is customary for waiters and waitresses to constantly inquire about the guests’ well-being. Thus, rule number one is: get yourself noticed as soon as you want to pay.[/icon_timeline_item][icon_timeline_item time_title=”Step 2: The waiting staff arrives at your table” icon_type=”selector” icon=”icomoon-the7-font-the7-comment-02″ icon_size=”32″ icon_color=”#81d742″ icon_color_bg=”#ffffff”]After the waitress has arrived at your table, you tell him/her you would like to pay. Please be aware in Germany it is common practice to pay separately or to split the bill, especially if you are in a group of friends.
So it may happen that the waitress will ask you whether you would like to pay the complete check or whether she should prepare separate checks.[/icon_timeline_item][icon_timeline_item time_title=”Step 3: Paying & tipping” icon_type=”selector” icon=”fas fa-euro-sign” icon_size=”30″ icon_color=”#81d742″ icon_color_bg=”#ffffff”]Now things are getting a bit hectic and the moment of the final culture shock has arrived. Paying the check with simultaneous tip calculation.
Germans are very effective when it comes to paying. The payment process consists of several interconnected actions. So we will slow down here a bit and separate the task.[/icon_timeline_item][icon_timeline_item time_title=”Step 3a: Checking the bill” icon_type=”selector” icon=”dt-icon-the7-menu-007″ icon_size=”30″ icon_color=”#81d742″ icon_color_bg=”#ffffff”]First the waitress will present you the bill. Look at the total amount you have to pay. Note that VAT is already included and that there is no “service charge”, “automated gratutity” or “recommended gratutity” in Germany. So you only pay what you see.[/icon_timeline_item][icon_timeline_item time_title=”Step 3b: Calculating the tip” icon_type=”selector” icon=”icomoon-font-awesome-14×14-plus” icon_size=”30″ icon_color=”#81d742″ icon_color_bg=”#ffffff”]Now things happen quickly: You must now calculate the desired tip in your head and add it to the total amount of the bill while the waitress waits next to you. You have read that correctly. The waitress will usually wait next to you and not as in other countries leave the table again, so that you can decide in a more relaxed way how much you want to tip.[/icon_timeline_item][icon_timeline_item time_title=”Step 3c: Finally paying (with tip)” icon_type=”selector” icon=”icomoon-font-awesome-14×14-credit-card” icon_size=”30″ icon_color=”#81d742″ icon_color_bg=”#ffffff”]After you know how much you want to pay including the tip, you tell the waitress the final amount. She will then usually give you the change for the specified amount. In case you are paying by card, she will usually enter the stated amount into the card payment terminal and you can pay as usual (PIN or signature).[/icon_timeline_item][/icon_timeline][vc_empty_space height=”50″][vc_single_image image=”1350″ img_size=”500×500″ alignment=”center” style=”vc_box_circle_2″][vc_empty_space height=”80″][vc_column_text]

How much tip should I give?

Now you know how tipping works in Germany. But the most important question is still unanswered. How much do you actually tip? Many travel books and also the internet often give the answer: 10% of the total amount.
But this is only a basic rule of thumb. Actually it is a little different, but not necessarily more difficult. As a traveler, you just have to get used to it. So in the following rules of thumb you will get the ultimate knowledge about how much you should tip in Munich, Bavaria and Germany.

 

Rules of thumb when tipping in a restaurant

[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”30″][vc_message message_box_color=”danger” icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-exclamation-circle”]Keep in mind that tipping in Germany is not necessary, as tips are not used to top up low wages of the service staff. Tips are just a nice “add-on” for the waitresses and waiters, but this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t tip.

Many travel books state you don’t have to tip in Germany. That is true… you don’t have to, but tipping is very common and considered as polite and nearly everyone does.[/vc_message][vc_message]Always add up to the next round amount. For example: 28,70 € is rounded to 30,00 €, but don’t let the tip fall under 1,00 €. A tip of 0,90 € or less is considered as impolite (unless you’re a backpacker or student on a budget, then a tip of 0,50 € is ok).[/vc_message][vc_message message_box_color=”danger” icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-exclamation-circle”]The more people you are and the higher the amount of the total bill, the higher should be the tip. A good amount is between one and two Euros per Person.

Example: 5 persons with a bill of 123,40 €. A total including tip of 125,00 € is good, 130,00 € is very polite and 135,00 € is quite generous.[/vc_message][vc_message]The more high class a restaurant is, the higher is the tip. While it is completely ok to add up to the next round amount in a regular restaurant or beer hall, you should be more generous when going out for fine dining. I would then recommend around 10% to 15% of the total bill and rounded to an even number.

Example: Two persons with a bill of 137,70 € in a high class restaurant. 150,00 € is good, 155,00 € is generous and 160,00 € is very generous.[/vc_message][vc_empty_space height=”80″][vc_column_text]

Rules of thumb when tipping other services

[/vc_column_text][vc_tta_accordion style=”modern” active_section=”1″ collapsible_all=”true”][vc_tta_section i_position=”right” i_icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-restroom” add_icon=”true” title=”Cleaning staff in a restroom” tab_id=”1582652309679-4c494812-6b4f”][vc_column_text]In public restrooms, but also partly in the restrooms of larger restaurants, theatres and similar facilities, cleaning staff can be found. Often these staff have a table and a seat at the entrance of the restroom. On this table you can often find a plate or a bowl where you can leave coins – tip.

restroom entrance

Even if it may seem you have to pay a fee, you do not have to pay for the use of the toilet (unless it is indicated!). However, the cleaning staff will be happy for a small tip, which you can throw into the plate or bowl after leaving the restroom.

An amount of 0,20 € to 0,50 € is sufficient.
If there is a tip or not, everybody should decide by himself.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section i_position=”right” i_icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-taxi” add_icon=”true” title=”Taxi drivers” tab_id=”1582652309682-0e8d8404-57cb”][vc_column_text]In Germany it is common practice to also tip taxi drivers or other taxi-like drivers as soon as you have reached your destination or finished your journey.

taxi driver

After the driver has told you the price or shown it to you on the taximeter, you can pay either with cash or with a card.
If you pay cash, tipping works the same way as in a restaurant. You calculate the total amount including tip in your head and tell the driver the amount. The driver will give you the appropriate change. When paying by card, you specify the desired amount and simply pay with PIN or signature. For some trips you can pay in advance via a mobile app and add a tip to your bill if you like. It is ok to add up to the next round amount.

Example: Taxi ride for 23,80 €. Adding up to 25,00 € is good. Taxi ride from Munich International Airport to the city centre for 86,30 €. Adding up 90,00 € is good.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section i_position=”right” i_icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-hamburger” add_icon=”true” title=”Takeaways and fast-food chains” tab_id=”1582652367801-b8380277-6ff8″][vc_column_text]In the many fast-food chains, coffee shops and takeaways it is not necessary to tip. Usually you enter the shop, order something and take it with you in a package or eat it at the shop.tip jar in a shop It is not necessary to leave a tip here, even if there is a tip-jar at the cash desk.
Of course you may tip if you like, but you shouldn’t have a bad conscience if you decide not to do so.

If you decide to throw a little tip into the tip-jar, take some spare change. 0,50 € to 1,50 € is good.

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